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Talent Wars: Are you prepared for battle?

November 25, 2014 by Laura Doehle
 
Laura Doehle

The war for talent is on, as most industries require very specific skills from their employees. Targeting and attracting that talent is critical to remain competitive in the marketplace. There are many ways to ensure your recruiting efforts are successful.

Resourceful HR’s top five tips:

  1. Create a contingency plan.
  2. There will always be unexpected vacancies and no candidates ready to fill the role. Recruiters are great at building a pipeline of talent and maintaining relationships with quality candidates. They should spend time finding professionals with critical skill sets or experiences that would be valuable to your organization to ensure you can move quickly in hiring someone should the original plan fall through.

  3. Vet your internal candidates and external talent pool.
  4. A good recruiter can gather market intelligence on the talent pool and see what the market has to offer. This will ensure that the decision to promote from within or offer training to existing employees is because they are the best person for the job and organization.

  5. Engage recruiters that know what you offer.
  6. Recruiters (internal and external) should serve as a brand representative for your organization. Maximize their ability to build interest and excitement for working for the organization.

  7. Craft your compelling story.
  8. All communications a qualified candidate receives, whether it be your website, job boards, postings, social media, or communications with your recruiter should help them understand what differentiates your organization and why they would be interested in joining your team. From organizational goals and career opportunity to the unique culture, every aspect of working for the organization should be used to garner enthusiasm for joining your team.

  9. Assess your culture before you make a hiring decision and ask the right questions.
  10. Articulating your culture and work environment and what it takes to thrive at your organization during the recruiting process will allow candidates to know what success entails. Asking the right questions of candidates will allow you to fully understand the likelihood a candidate will be able to perform as needed. (Link to: http://springboard.resourcefulhr.com/successfully-assessing-cultural-fit/)

Quiz: Is it time to bring in recruiting resources?

There are some tell-tale signs that it is time to outsource recruiting. If you answer yes to two or more of these questions it may be time to look for a recruiting partner.
1. Is it taking you longer than expected to find quality candidates?
2. Are you spending your time weeding through candidate resumes that are clearly not the right fit?
3. Is recruiting taking your time away from your core business functions?
4. Are you experiencing high turnover rates from employees you hired that aren’t the right fit?

Seattle’s Paid Sick and Safe Time Ordinance is Here to Stay – Tips on how to be compliant

October 29, 2014 by Jennifer Olsen
 
Jennifer Olsen

It’s been almost two years since Seattle’s paid sick and safe time ordinance (PSST) has passed. Since then it has received both good and bad reviews by policy makers, business owners and employees. As part of the ordinance the City of Seattle asked the Office of the City Auditor and the University of Washington to conduct a study to examine whether employers were knowledgeable about the ordinance, whether they were implementing it and if so how was it affecting their organization.

At a glance, survey results include:

  • The majority of employers are offering some paid leave to full and part time employees.
  • Nearly 40% of employers report that they either do not cover part and full time workers or fail to provide the minimum required hours of leave to their full time workers (hours of leave provided to part time workers were not tracked).
  • Costs to employers and impact on businesses have been modest and smaller than anticipated.
  • Workers view the ordinance as helpful and as a ‘safety net’ so they can take care of themselves and their families.

It is interesting to note that even though the majority of employers are offering some paid leave, it does not mean they are in compliance with the ordinance. And while the ordinance has both its advocates and detractors, PSST is not going away for the near term. So now is the time if you haven’t already to review your organization’s PSST policy and ensure it is compliant.
Here are some key questions you can ask yourself to determine if you are implementing this policy correctly at your organization:

  • Are you keeping accurate records of PSST hours and storing them correctly? For instance, if an employee quits and has unused PSST, you are required to hold on to that person’s records because if he/she returns within seven months they are entitled to those hours.
  • Do you have a company headquartered outside Seattle but have employees doing business in Seattle? You are required to be compliant with the PSST ordinance. You can find more information and guidelines here. http://springboard.resourcefulhr.com/the-occasional-basis-worker-under-seattles-paid-sick-and-safe-time-benefit-ordinance-obligations-for-companies-based-outside-of-seattle/
  • Do you have paid interns? They are covered.
  • Do you employ independent contractors? Independent contractors are not covered. If you have questions regarding the classification of an employee versus independent contractor, you can purchase our resource guide here.
  • Do you have a policy in place regarding PSST so that employees know what is expected of them and how they will receive information about this ordinance? For example, do employees know in what instances it is appropriate to use PSST and when they cannot? Do employees know they can not ask HR or whomever is keeping records for an update on their accrued hours whenever they want and that it will be shared with them on each pay stub.

If you have questions about what is required to be compliant and how to write a policy for your organization, send us an email.
You can view the Office of the City Auditor and University of Washington report in its entirety here.

The “Occasional Basis Worker” Under Seattle’s Paid Sick and Safe Time Benefit Ordinance – Obligations for Companies Based Outside of Seattle

October 14, 2014 by Amy Gaskill
 
Amy Gaskill

Seattle’s paid sick and safe time benefit (PSST) went into effect on September 1, 2012. It may seem like eons ago considering all that you are working on but it may be something that has slipped off your radar due to your full plate. Or maybe your company is growing and is sending workers into the city for the first time since the ordinance took effect. This is the important element to consider: Even if your headquarters are outside of Seattle but have employees that travel to Seattle for client work you are still mandated to adhere to the Seattle PSST ordinance. The Seattle Office of Civil Rights requires that “Occasional Basis Workers” must accrue PSST after working 240 paid hours within the city limits. The amount of accrual varies and we can help you design a policy that works for your organization – more details and resources below.

Quick tips and several resources to help manage this process:

  • An “Occasional Basis Worker” is defined as one who works primarily outside the City of Seattle, but who works inside the city limits on an ad hoc, irregular basis.
  • Companies must track hours worked in Seattle for all workers. (See the exception for qualifying PTO programs, below.)
  • Accrual time starts the minute your employee arrives in the Seattle City limits from the time they leave, except when the employee is just driving through. This means that even if there is a traffic jam on the way to the meeting downtown, they must accrue PSST hours.
  • Accrual of PSST hours begins on the 241st hour of work within the Seattle City Limits. Employees must be allowed to use accrued PSST hours no later than 180 days from the day they begin accruing.
  • There are different accrual rates based on whether you are tier one, two or three company. This is a great place to learn more information: http://www.seattle.gov/civilrights/spssto.htm
  • If your company offers Paid Time Off (PTO) program that allows employees to use the benefit hours for issues that would qualify for PSST, and the accrual rate meets the minimum requirements under the PSST, tracking hours worked within the city limits is not required. However, all other requirements of the PSST (such as qualifying events and minimum usage requirements) must be met within your existing policy.
  • Commission-only and piece rate workers must also track their hours worked within the city, and must be compensated at least at minimum wage for PSST hours used.

For even more information check out: http://equinoxbusinesslaw.com/?s=paid+sick+and+safe+time

Do you have questions regarding this ordinance? – how to write a compliant policy, how to track it, how to apply it – let us know! We also look forward to hearing your tips on how you are tracking hours and remaining compliant. Let us know in the comments below.