Resourceful HR logo

Resourceful HR: Re-evaluating what makes us unique

January 30, 2015 by Jennifer Olsen
 
Jennifer Olsen

You should see my living room this morning. It’s covered in flip chart paper. What started out as a new web site project has morphed into a dissection of our business

  • What is our brand promise?
  • What service standards can our clients expect?
  • How do we know when we’ve met their expectations?

I know that loosely in our minds we have general ideas that answer these questions but I think it’s time we get it down on paper and share it with you. I’ll want to take some time with this over the course of the year to really dive into what makes us truly unique from other HR firms and what makes our clients raving fans. I’ll share this journey with you as I expect I am not the only one who struggles with how to articulate who, what and why a business exists to the outside world with clarity and truth. Posts won’t come on a “schedule”. They’ll come as we finish a piece or discover some nugget of what we think might be wisdom and useful to share. Our blog will be less of reference guide moving forward and instead be a journey of evolvement both internally at Resourceful HR and from what we learn working with clients and external research. We hope you appreciate the change in focus and invite your feedback. One thing I know for sure about us is our desire for feedback. It’s what fuels us to keep doing what’s working and immediately tweak what could be changed.
I hope 2015 is off to an exciting start for you. Cheers to what’s possible for all of us in the year 2015.

Go HAWKS!
– Jennifer

Talent Wars: Are you prepared for battle?

November 25, 2014 by Laura Doehle
 
Laura Doehle

The war for talent is on, as most industries require very specific skills from their employees. Targeting and attracting that talent is critical to remain competitive in the marketplace. There are many ways to ensure your recruiting efforts are successful.

Resourceful HR’s top five tips:

  1. Create a contingency plan.
  2. There will always be unexpected vacancies and no candidates ready to fill the role. Recruiters are great at building a pipeline of talent and maintaining relationships with quality candidates. They should spend time finding professionals with critical skill sets or experiences that would be valuable to your organization to ensure you can move quickly in hiring someone should the original plan fall through.

  3. Vet your internal candidates and external talent pool.
  4. A good recruiter can gather market intelligence on the talent pool and see what the market has to offer. This will ensure that the decision to promote from within or offer training to existing employees is because they are the best person for the job and organization.

  5. Engage recruiters that know what you offer.
  6. Recruiters (internal and external) should serve as a brand representative for your organization. Maximize their ability to build interest and excitement for working for the organization.

  7. Craft your compelling story.
  8. All communications a qualified candidate receives, whether it be your website, job boards, postings, social media, or communications with your recruiter should help them understand what differentiates your organization and why they would be interested in joining your team. From organizational goals and career opportunity to the unique culture, every aspect of working for the organization should be used to garner enthusiasm for joining your team.

  9. Assess your culture before you make a hiring decision and ask the right questions.
  10. Articulating your culture and work environment and what it takes to thrive at your organization during the recruiting process will allow candidates to know what success entails. Asking the right questions of candidates will allow you to fully understand the likelihood a candidate will be able to perform as needed. (Link to: http://springboard.resourcefulhr.com/successfully-assessing-cultural-fit/)

Quiz: Is it time to bring in recruiting resources?

There are some tell-tale signs that it is time to outsource recruiting. If you answer yes to two or more of these questions it may be time to look for a recruiting partner.
1. Is it taking you longer than expected to find quality candidates?
2. Are you spending your time weeding through candidate resumes that are clearly not the right fit?
3. Is recruiting taking your time away from your core business functions?
4. Are you experiencing high turnover rates from employees you hired that aren’t the right fit?

Seattle’s Paid Sick and Safe Time Ordinance is Here to Stay – Tips on how to be compliant

October 29, 2014 by Jennifer Olsen
 
Jennifer Olsen

It’s been almost two years since Seattle’s paid sick and safe time ordinance (PSST) has passed. Since then it has received both good and bad reviews by policy makers, business owners and employees. As part of the ordinance the City of Seattle asked the Office of the City Auditor and the University of Washington to conduct a study to examine whether employers were knowledgeable about the ordinance, whether they were implementing it and if so how was it affecting their organization.

At a glance, survey results include:

  • The majority of employers are offering some paid leave to full and part time employees.
  • Nearly 40% of employers report that they either do not cover part and full time workers or fail to provide the minimum required hours of leave to their full time workers (hours of leave provided to part time workers were not tracked).
  • Costs to employers and impact on businesses have been modest and smaller than anticipated.
  • Workers view the ordinance as helpful and as a ‘safety net’ so they can take care of themselves and their families.

It is interesting to note that even though the majority of employers are offering some paid leave, it does not mean they are in compliance with the ordinance. And while the ordinance has both its advocates and detractors, PSST is not going away for the near term. So now is the time if you haven’t already to review your organization’s PSST policy and ensure it is compliant.
Here are some key questions you can ask yourself to determine if you are implementing this policy correctly at your organization:

  • Are you keeping accurate records of PSST hours and storing them correctly? For instance, if an employee quits and has unused PSST, you are required to hold on to that person’s records because if he/she returns within seven months they are entitled to those hours.
  • Do you have a company headquartered outside Seattle but have employees doing business in Seattle? You are required to be compliant with the PSST ordinance. You can find more information and guidelines here. http://springboard.resourcefulhr.com/the-occasional-basis-worker-under-seattles-paid-sick-and-safe-time-benefit-ordinance-obligations-for-companies-based-outside-of-seattle/
  • Do you have paid interns? They are covered.
  • Do you employ independent contractors? Independent contractors are not covered. If you have questions regarding the classification of an employee versus independent contractor, you can purchase our resource guide here.
  • Do you have a policy in place regarding PSST so that employees know what is expected of them and how they will receive information about this ordinance? For example, do employees know in what instances it is appropriate to use PSST and when they cannot? Do employees know they can not ask HR or whomever is keeping records for an update on their accrued hours whenever they want and that it will be shared with them on each pay stub.

If you have questions about what is required to be compliant and how to write a policy for your organization, send us an email.
You can view the Office of the City Auditor and University of Washington report in its entirety here.